Does Apple Cider Vinegar Live up to the Hype?

Does this apple cider vinegar really work wonders, or is it another noncredible fad?

  • Published: 9/5/2022
  • 3 min. read

Has a friend or family member told you about all of the benefits of apple cider vinegar? Fans rave about its fat burning, belly bloat deflating and detoxing effects. Does this tart-tasting liquid really work wonders, or is it another noncredible fad?

What is apple cider vinegar?

Apple cider vinegar is a tart-tasting vinegar commonly added to salad dressings, chutneys and marinades. It’s made by combining juice from apples with yeast. The yeast converts the natural sugar into alcohol, then bacteria ferment the alcohol into acetic acid, giving a tart and vinegary taste (1).

Apple cider vinegar’s uses go beyond culinary. It has been used for ages as a remedy for anything from wounds to better-looking hair. Recently it’s been making a comeback, claiming medicinal benefits such as regulating blood sugar and curbing cravings, aiding in fat burn and detox and improving digestive wellness (2). However, there hasn’t been enough scientific evidence to support these claims.

Does apple cider vinegar really work?

Although research doesn’t clinically back most of the claims about apple cider vinegar, some self-reports and studies show it may help relieve certain symptoms.

Cravings 

Some people use apple cider vinegar to help tame their appetites and cravings. In one small study, participants who drank 20 grams of apple cider vinegar after a high-carb meal had lower blood sugar after the meal (3). Since fluctuating blood sugar may lead to cravings, this could help some people feel more satisfied.

Fat burning qualities

When participants in a weight loss study drank 15ml of apple cider vinegar with lunch and dinner, they ate an estimated 250 calories less than their daily requirements. As a result, they lost an average of 3.8 more pounds over 12 weeks when compared to the group who did not drink it (4). Keep in mind that this was just one study, and just because you take apple cider vinegar doesn’t mean that you will lose weight. Reaching a healthy weight comes down to an overall healthy lifestyle, making sure you get good sleep and following a healthy eating plan, such as with Lifesum

Reducing bloating

There is limited scientific evidence linking apple cider vinegar to bloating relief but some people have reported that it helps. In fact, one clinical study showed that apple cider vinegar may actually impair the movement of your stomach, making matters worse (5). In some cases, having some apple cider vinegar may help with digestion. If you want to try, add a tablespoon or two to a glass of warm water to have before or after a meal or when you feel bloated. 

Cleansing

Apple cider vinegar is an example of a cleansing diet that has become popular in the last few years. However, there isn’t much research that suggests that this type of cleanse can promote detox. Our bodies’ organs like the liver and kidney are constantly working on cleaning your body from toxins. If you want to support your body in “detoxing,” it’s important to eat balanced, minimally processed foods including lots of fruits, vegetables and other nutritious foods like nuts and seeds. You can also start by clearing out some sugar: see our Sugar detox plan.

How to make the most of your apple cider vinegar?

Apple cider vinegar should be fine when consumed in normal amounts (about 1-2 tablespoons per day). You may want to avoid it if you suffer from acid reflux. If you’re new to apple cider vinegar, start with less and try diluting it in water. Minimize its exposure to your teeth, such as with a straw, since it may harm your enamel. 

When choosing an apple cider vinegar, go for the raw, unfiltered and organic types whenever possible. That’s because the natural forms contain yeast and healthy bacteria. They also have a bit of extra nutrients helping to contribute to an overall healthy way of eating

All of the content and media on Lifesum is created and published for information purposes only. It is not intended to be used as a substitute for medical advice or treatment. Users should always consult with a doctor or other health care professional for medical advice.

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All of the content and media on Lifesum is created and published for information purposes only. It is not intended to be used as a substitute for medical advice or treatment. Users should always consult with a doctor or other health care professional for medical advice. If you have or think you are at risk of developing an eating disorder, do not use the Lifesum app and seek immediate medical help.

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